Orkney & Shetland

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    • Sleeps2
    • Bedrooms1
    • PetsNo
    • Luxury Holiday Houses rating

    A seaside cottage resting in the stunning scenery of St Margaret’s Hope, Orkney. (Ref. 1111537)

    • Wi-fi
    • Off-road parking
    • Dishwasher
    • Washing machine

    7 nights from £1254

    Secure this property with a 30% deposit* Book now
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The ferry from Scrabster, on mainland Scotland, to Stromness sails past the impressive red stone sea-stack of the Old Man of Hoy, then on below the cliffs of St John's Head - the highest vertical cliff in the UK - making this the most dramatic way of reaching Orkney. Yet the drama of Hoy is misleading as the landscapes elsewhere are much gentler and well farmed. Orkney offers a rich variety of activities on land, loch and sea to suit all abilities and interests, from golfing to walking, and from sailing to cycling. With almost 600 miles of coast and some great unspoilt areas, the islands are superb for wildlife watching and for rich and varied angling. Divers love it too, particularly around Scapa Flow where wartime wrecks from the First World War provide fascinating underwater exploration.

Shetland is closer to Norway than mainland Scotland and this unique cultural heritage is reflected in the areas distinctive dialect and Norse place names. Iron Age brochs, mysterious standing stones, Pictish wheelhouses and traditional croft-houses tell the history of these remote islands, while festivals such as Up Helly Aa make for spectacular celebration of more contemporary customs. Being so far north means it scarcely goes dark in summer while the Northern Lights are frequently spotted in autumn and winter.

We currently have no properties registered with us in this region but watch this space for new ones coming on board.